Arkhaven logo

Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 0
Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 1

Early in my childhood I became fascinated by the world of Nature.

Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 3
Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 4

I recall walking out of the yard, and on to the road overlooking the city far below. I was barely four years old, then.

I saw a milkweed plant on the roadside. Its delicate pink and beige flowers, were alive with jewel-like metallic green beetles, and orange milkweed bugs. I was fascinated, and so I picked some, and brought it home to my mother.  

But Mother said it stunk, and forced me to dispose of it. I didn’t understand why she didn’t like my bouquet, so I brought home some more. Once again, she angrily threw it out.

“Don’t you bring that smelly skunkweed home or run away again! Do you hear? It might be poisonous!” And she locked me in the back yard.

Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 6
Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 7

There was only one other house on the road. The boys who lived there were a little older than I, but they wouldn’t play with me because they didn’t understand my serious interest in nature. Often they shoved me around, which made me very lonely.

So I took even more interest in nature, and like other boys, I created strange creatures in my imagination, like heroes and villains of the wild.

I called these bird-like creatures the Telephonepolies. When I heard an exciting piece of a symphony on the radio it would turn my imagination loose, and I would feel the great power of these destructive creatures.


Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 9

In the Anise forests there were Little Gorder Telephonepolies that would sting you with their three stingers.

Story Three: Telephonepolies image number 11
The Lost Era Transcripts series cover
Story Three: Telephonepolies episode cover
15,187 views · 844 likes
21 comments

The Lost Era Transcripts

Created by
author avatar placeholder
JW MacLean
Artist Pete Hampton, (1940-2018) was a wildly eccentric genius. He created slide shows of his paintings to tell the beautiful, and terrifying stories of his early childhood in the remote hills of Southern California. This work was re created from Pete's journals and the original paintings from 1961 through the early 1970's.
,
List icon
Comment icon
Prev icon
Next icon
Fullscreen icon